At Emendo, we do not believe in a one solution fits all gene editing approach. We believe the pathway to curing diseases is a tailor-made custom solution per target.

The foundation of our discovery platform is a continuously evolving panel of novel nucleases, each with different characteristics and applications, that allows us to dramatically broaden the area of the genome that is targetable.

To achieve the optimal gene editing solution for each disease, we use protein engineering and directed evolution to create the best nuclease available for each specific indication, optimize the gene editing process for that target, and develop a custom drug composition with ultra-high target specificity and elimination of off-target effects.

 

And if we don’t have the right nuclease, we will go back to the discovery process and find it.

Discover

We start by analyzing the disease characteristics, mechanism of action, and genetic alterations, then design an editing strategy that would address as much of the patient population as possible.

  • Genetic analysis (Pseudogenes, copy number)
  • Required editing (KI, KO)
  • Design specific editing strategy
  • Select and test guides
  • Discover and test nucleases
  • Verify editing on genomic, mRNA and protein levels
  • Verify functional output in model cells
  • Verify functional output in patient-derived cells
  • Determine off-targets, inversions and translocations

Optimize

The most effective strategy moves into Lead Optimization where it is optimized through protein engineering, guide design and library selection.

  • Optimize guide per target
  • Optimize nuclease per target
  • Protein engineering
  • Libraries selections for variants
  • Monitoring on and off-target
  • Finalize composition
  • Pack composition in a delivery vehicle
  • Optimize per delivery vehicle

Develop

During Development, the gene editing strategy is validated on patient-derived cells.

  • POC in-vivo
  • Process development
  • Scale-up and manufacturing
  • Regulatory submission
  • Tox studies
  • Large animals
  • Clinical development
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